The OOI Ocean Data Lab Project

The National Science Foundation’s Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) is advancing our ability to understand the natural world by collecting large quantities of data to address complex oceanographic processes. This expanded access to data also provides professors in the geosciences with new opportunities to engage undergraduate students in authentic data experiences using real-world data sets to teach geoscience processes.

However, students struggle to work with data based on their limited experience and exposure to different data types and sources. Also, supporting students in engaging with the data can be challenging for professors too, as there is a lack of adequate tools to easily digest and manipulate large data sets for in-class learning experiences.

Therefore, the OOI Ocean Data Lab Project (formerly called Data Explorations), with funding from NSF, is developing, testing, refining, and disseminating easy to use, interactive Data Explorations and Data Lab Notebooks that will allow undergraduates to use authentic data in accessible ways while being easy for professors to integrate into their teaching.


Recent Blog Posts

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Tropical Storm Andrea clouds up the ocean

This week, was the start of the 2013 Hurricane Season, and already forecasters have declared the first storm of the season, Tropical Storm Andrea.
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Next Generation Activity Development

Last week, I had an opportunity to look through the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) alongside many other ocean educators at the COSEE Network Meeting. Our goal was to figure out how the NGSS could be used to develop activities.

Blog Roundup #1 – Ocean Science and More

I hope to occasionally share some of my favorite web sites and blogs in easily digestible chunks. This first roundup features some of the top sites on ocean, climate and environmental data and science.
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Streamflow and Conductance on the Delaware

Conductance is an important measurement of water quality in rivers, and it is often related to river discharge.
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Streamflow on the Delaware

While temperature, pressure or humidity change with more predictable variation throughout the course of a year, streamflow is more closely correlated with major rain and snow events that occur sporadically throughout the year, often in large doses.